PSEG N.J. Salem 1 reactor in hot shutdown mode

NEW YORK, Nov 10 (Reuters) – Public Service Enterprise Group Inc’s (PEG.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 1,174-megawatt Unit 1 at the Salem nuclear power station in New Jersey was in hot shutdown mode on Nov. 7, the company told the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in a report.

Electricity traders noted hot shutdown mode meant the unit was likely getting close to exiting a refueling outage begun on Oct. 14.

Unit 1 last shut for refueling from March 27 to April 20, 2007. It is on an 18-month refueling cycle.

The 3,562 MW Salem/Hope Creek station is located along the Delaware River in Salem, about 40 miles south of Philadelphia. There are three reactors at the station, the 1,174 MW Salem 1, which entered service in 1977, 1,130 MW Salem 2 (1981) and the 1,220 MW Hope Creek (1986), along with the 38 MW Salem 3 oil-fired turbine.

Salem 2 meanwhile continued to operate at 87 percent power.

Hope Creek continued to operate at 97 percent.

One MW powers about 800 homes in New Jersey.

PSEG operates the station and owns all of Hope Creek and about 57 percent of Salem. Exelon Corp (EXC.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) owns the remaining 43 percent of Salem.

In August 2007, PSEG said it planned to spend $50 million between 2007 and 2011 to explore the possible construction of a new reactor at Hope Creek.

PSEG told the NRC it planned to file for a 20-year extension of the original 40-year operating licenses for Hope Creek and both Salem units in September 2009.

PSEG, of Newark, New Jersey, owns and operates more than 16,500 MW of generating capacity, markets energy commodities, and transmits and distributes electricity to 2.1 million customers and natural gas to 1.7 million customers in New Jersey and another 2.9 million customers around the world. (Reporting by Scott DiSavino; Editing by John Picinich)

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http://www.reuters.com/article/marketsNews/idUSN1044956520081110

Exelon N.J. Oyster Creek reactor shut

NEW YORK, Oct 27 (Reuters) – Exelon Corp’s (EXC.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 619-megawatt Oyster Creek nuclear power station in New Jersey shut by early Monday, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said in a report.

On Friday, the unit was operating at 94 percent of capacity as it coasted down for a planned month-long refueling and maintenance outage expected to start in late October.

Electricity traders guessed the unit shut for the refuel.

Oyster Creek, the oldest operating nuclear reactor in the nation, is in Forked River in Ocean County, about 60 miles east of Philadelphia. It entered service in 1969.

One MW powers about 800 homes in New Jersey.

In July 2005, Exelon applied with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to renew the plant’s original 40-year operating license for another 20 years.

In September 2008, a federal review board held a hearing related to Exelon’s proposal to inspect the plant’s drywell, which was the subject of a contention filed with the NRC by a group of environmental and community organizations opposed to the license renewal.

So long as the renewal process is ongoing, Exelon can continue to operate the plant even after the license expires in 2009.

Exelon’s AmerGen Energy Co subsidiary owns the station, while its Exelon Generation Co LLC subsidiary operates it.

Exelon, of Chicago, owns and operates more than 38,000 MW of generating capacity, markets energy commodities. It transmits and distributes electricity to 5.4 million and distributes natural gas to 480,000 customers in Illinois and Pennsylvania. (Reporting by Scott DiSavino; Editing by John Picinich)

http://www.reuters.com/article/marketsNews/idUSN2730895220081027

Reactor is closed

Reactor is closed

21/10/2008 5:25:00 PM
THE OPAL research reactor at ANSTO’s Lucas Heights centre shut down on Tuesday.The reactor will be closed for a fortnight for a regular fuel change and to replace heavy water in its reflector vessel.

An ANSTO spokeswoman said the reactor should be back to full operation on or about Monday, November 3.

“Following return to full operation, the first stage in restarting production of Technetium-99, which is the most-used product, can begin,” the spokewoman said.

“This is a major step towards recommencing full nuclear medicine production and irradiation of silicon for the semi-conductor industry.

“Technetium-99 is being imported, which is costly and subject to periodic interruptions of supply.”

OPAL has had a chequered history since the discovery in 2006 of a water seepage that was slowly diluting the heavy water that surrounds the reactor.

In June last year, the discovery of a design fault involving the reactor’s fuel plates forced a 10-month shutdown.

The ANSTO spokeswoman said ANSTO and Argentine designers INVAP were investigating ways of permanently fixing the seepage points.

“All rectification of defects is the responsibility of the reactor designers INVAP,” the spokeswoman said.

“Once repairs are complete and OPAL is operating to ANSTO’s satisfaction, negotiations will be finalised regarding costs.

“The heavy water, which is located in the reflector vessel, is being replaced, because over the past two years normal water from the surrounding reactor pool has slowly seeped in and diluted it.

“Heavy water reflects neutrons back into the reactor core to sustain the nuclear reaction.

“Although this is not a safety issue and does not prevent operation of the reactor, the dilution reduces neutron intensity, which in turn can affect the ability to irradiate targets for radiopharmaceutical production and silicon irradiation.”

http://stgeorge.yourguide.com.au/news/local/news/general/reactor-is-closed/1339463.aspx

Progress N.C. Harris reactor shut

NEW YORK, Aug 11 (Reuters) – Progress Energy Inc’s (PGN.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 900-megawatt Harris nuclear power station in North Carolina shut by early Monday, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said in a report.

On Friday, the unit was operating at full power.

The Harris station, which entered service in 1987, is located in Wake County, about 20 miles southwest of Raleigh, North Carolina.

One MW powers about 700 homes in North Carolina.

Progress Energy, of Raleigh, North Carolina, operates the station for its owners, Progress (83.5 percent) and North Carolina Municipal Power (16.5 percent).

In Nov 2006, Progress filed for a 20-year extension of the unit’s original 40-year operating license. The NRC said it expects to make a decision in December 2008 without a hearing or August 2009 with a hearing.

In 2008, Progress applied with the NRC to build two of Toshiba Corp’s (6502.T: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 1,100 MW Westinghouse AP1000 reactors at Harris. If the company decides to move forward with the new reactors, they could enter service as soon as 2018.

Progress has not said in press releases how much the new plant would cost.

In Florida however, Progress estimated two new Westinghouse AP1000 reactors would cost about $14 billion plus another $3 billion for transmission upgrades.

The transmission upgrades may not be as necessary at Harris, electricity traders noted, because the 35 square mile Harris site was originally planned for four nuclear reactors. Due to changing economic conditions in the 1970s and 1980s, Progress only built one reactor.

Progress, of Raleigh, North Carolina, owns and operates more than 21,000 MW of generating capacity, markets energy commodities, and transmits and distributes electricity to about 3.1 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida.

(Reporting by Scott DiSavino; Editing by John Picinich)

Progress N.C. Harris reactor shut

EW YORK, Aug 11 (Reuters) – Progress Energy Inc’s (PGN.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 900-megawatt Harris nuclear power station in North Carolina shut by early Monday, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission said in a report.

On Friday, the unit was operating at full power.

The Harris station, which entered service in 1987, is located in Wake County, about 20 miles southwest of Raleigh, North Carolina.

One MW powers about 700 homes in North Carolina.

Progress Energy, of Raleigh, North Carolina, operates the station for its owners, Progress (83.5 percent) and North Carolina Municipal Power (16.5 percent).

In Nov 2006, Progress filed for a 20-year extension of the unit’s original 40-year operating license. The NRC said it expects to make a decision in December 2008 without a hearing or August 2009 with a hearing.

In 2008, Progress applied with the NRC to build two of Toshiba Corp’s (6502.T: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) 1,100 MW Westinghouse AP1000 reactors at Harris. If the company decides to move forward with the new reactors, they could enter service as soon as 2018.

Progress has not said in press releases how much the new plant would cost.

In Florida however, Progress estimated two new Westinghouse AP1000 reactors would cost about $14 billion plus another $3 billion for transmission upgrades.

The transmission upgrades may not be as necessary at Harris, electricity traders noted, because the 35 square mile Harris site was originally planned for four nuclear reactors. Due to changing economic conditions in the 1970s and 1980s, Progress only built one reactor.

Progress, of Raleigh, North Carolina, owns and operates more than 21,000 MW of generating capacity, markets energy commodities, and transmits and distributes electricity to about 3.1 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida.

(Reporting by Scott DiSavino; Editing by John Picinich)