Hiroshima, Nagasaki nuclear attack posters presented at RCC-SOU Higher Ed Center

Posters showing images from the World War II nuclear attacks on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are on exhibit through the end of the month at Rogue Community College-Southern Oregon University Higher Education Center in downtown Medford.

The exhibit on the second floor of the higher education center, 101 S. Bartlett St., Medford, is open and free to the public.

The center is open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

The posters from the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum have been featured at other universities across the nation in an effort to boost awareness about the devastating effects of nuclear proliferation, said Hideko “Tammy” Snider, a Medford resident and Hiroshima survivor.

“We have enough nuclear warheads today to extinguish the entire human race and this without real education of the consequences of the nuclear use in the general public,” Snider said. “The increased awareness is so necessary so that we can stem the tide.”

The posters show images and tell the story of the attacks, including the death of more than 200,000 people in both cities and subsequent health problems that followed survivors.

Snider will be visiting universities on the East Coast through Tuesday to talk about her experiences during the attack.

“It will be a tough tour, sharing and focusing on my core grief but it is absolutely necessary that we must face the danger for the future of our civilization, if not for our children and their children,” Snider said.

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081017/NEWS/810170325

Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivor Calls for Complete Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivor Calls for Complete Elimination of Nuclear Weapons
by Sharat G. Lin
Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM

Antinuclear protesters gathered at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the 63rd anniversary of the U.S. dropping the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. They were joined by Reverend Nobuaki Hanaoka, who survived that devastating attack and called for the “complete elimination of nuclear weapons from the face of the earth.”

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At 11:02 a.m. on Saturday, August 9, 2008, antinuclear protesters observed a moment of silence for the tens of thousands of civilians who were instantly killed when the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Nagasaki, Japan 63 years ago. The total number of deaths from the blast are believed to have reached 70,000-80,000 by the end of 1945.

Peace, social justice, and environmental activists from throughout Northern California gathered at the northwest corner of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to protest the continuing research by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a new generation of nuclear weapons. They called for “a nuclear-free future.”

A sprawling “nuclear maze” displayed an exhibition on the nuclear blast damage to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the U.S. nuclear weapons program, uranium mining, problems of nuclear waste disposal, and the adverse biological effects of fissile nuclear materials. The exhibit drew attention to the more than one thousand nuclear bomb tests that the United States has conducted since the beginning of the Manhattan Project. The maze was set up at the corner of Patterson Pass and Vasco Roads, the usual assembly point for the annual antinuclear protests.

Cara Bautista of Peace Action West (http://www.peaceactionwest.org), one of the 17 cosponsoring organizations, opened the program. She introduced Kaylah Marin, a Hip Hop and neo-soul vocalist, renaissance artist, guitarist, and writer who sang and performed spoken word for the crowd.

The keynote speaker was Reverend Nobuaki Hanaoka, who was less than 8 months old when the U.S. atomic bomb exploded in Nagasaki. He told of how he and his family were spared from the blast and firestorm, but that his mother succumbed to radiation sickness within six years, followed by his sister, and then his brother. In 1978, he helped organize the Friends of Hibakusha (survivors of the bombings), serving as its first chairperson, to support atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the United States, and to advocate for a nuclear-free world.

In reviewing the circumstances of the U.S. first-use of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Reverend Hanaoka pointed out that Emperor Hirohito had already been considering the conditions of surrender well before the first A-bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. This fact had already been communicated to President Truman by the Soviets. Thus, dropping the bomb on Hiroshima, Hanaoka argued, was militarily unnecessary. The real purpose of dropping the uranium-235 bomb was to send a clear signal to the Soviet Union that the United States was the global superpower emerging from the ashes of World War II.

One of several purposes of the plutonium-239 bomb dropped on Nagasaki was to prove the effectiveness of both types of fission warheads on human populations. The timing of the bombing was advanced in response to the Soviet invasion of Japanese-occupied Manchuria just eleven hours earlier. The United States remains the only country in history to ever use nuclear weapons in combat, and the only country to use them in first strikes.

Reverend Hanaoka called for the “complete elimination of nuclear weapons from the face of the Earth.” Referring to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) that divides the world between the five original nuclear powers (permanent U.N. Security Council members) and all other countries, he said, “NPT for other countries is not going to work.” He added that the U.S. claimed to be enforcing the NPT by attacking Iraq, but the subsequent U.S. threats to Iran’s security only encouraged Iran to “proliferate.”

Despite the NPT, the U.S. continues to develop and refine its own nuclear arsenal of over 10,000 warheads at centers like the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. LLNL is one of two U.S. government facilities in the San Francisco Bay Area that handle advanced nuclear weapons, the other being the Navy facility operated with the assistance of Lockheed Martin in Sunnyvale for assembling submarine-launched Trident nuclear warheads.

Reverend Hanaoka called for an end to all such work that only increases the rationale for first use and the risk of nuclear terrorism. He concluded by saying that we must “never allow another Hiroshima and Nagasaki anywhere in the world.”

Marylia Kelley of Tri-Valley CAREs (http://www.trivalleycares.org), which has been organizing annual non-violent resistance actions for decades against nuclear weapons work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, explained, “We are here on August 9th because Livermore Lab has been chosen to develop the United States’ next new nuclear bomb, the so-called Reliable Replacement Warhead. We are here because Livermore Lab is home to more than a thousand pounds of plutonium, which makes us all vulnerable to a catastrophic release. And we are here to show the government and the public that there is another future possible, one based on global nuclear disarmament. We say ‘never again’ to the use of nuclear weapons.”

A lone counter-protester sat in his army jeep with signs reading, “63 years ago B-29s saved 1 million GIs and 5 million Japs.” Perhaps oblivious to the derogatory implication of his ethnic slur, he seemed equally unaware of Japan’s active feelers through the Soviet Union to find a way to surrender while seeking only to preserve to honor of the monarchy before the first bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

Each year on the anniversary of the A-bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Tri-Valley CAREs and supporting peace and justice groups have organized original and uniquely creative actions at the gates of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Some actions have involved non-violent civil disobedience.

For example, on August 6, 2007, antinuclear resisters staged a die-in across the pavement blocking the West Gate to LLNL. Fellow protesters drew chalk outlines around the “fallen bodies” to leave a chilling symbol of the human toll of nuclear weapons developed at LLNL. A score of antinuclear resisters, including priests and nuns, then faced off with the LLNL Protective Service police before being arrested by Alameda County Sheriff’s deputies.

On August 6, 2006, non-violent civil disobedience was considered, but then abandoned in favor of leaving flowers of peace on the chain-link West Gate. That protest featured an immense 25-meter long balloon in the shape of a ballistic missile.

Among the many cosponsoring organizations is the Livermore Conversion Project, which advocates converting LLNL to peaceful humanitarian research along the lines of its sister lab, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The Mount Diablo Peace and Justice Center (http://www.mtdpc.org) has also long been a regular supporter of the annual actions protesting nuclear weapons research at LLNL.

Nuclear Maze

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Nuclear maze sprawling along Patterson Pass Road in Livermore.

Moment of Silence

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Moment of silence for 40,000+ people killed in Nagasaki at 11:02 a.m. on August 9, 1945.

Cara Bautista

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
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Cara Bautista moderating the rally.

Kaylah Marin

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Kaylah Marin signing for peace and justice.

Nobuaki Hanaoka

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Nobuaki Hanaoka speaking for the abolition of all nuclear weapons and pre-emptive wars.

Nobuaki Hanaoka

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Nobuaki Hanaoka addressing the rally.

Nuclear Maze

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Nuclear maze: people browsing exhibits.

Nuclear Maze

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Nuclear maze: list of over 1000 U.S. nuclear tests.

Raging Grannies

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
Raging Grannies signing songs of peace and justice.

Antinuclear Participants

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
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Antinuclear participants at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Lone Counter-protester

by Sharat G. Lin Sunday Aug 17th, 2008 3:38 AM
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Lone counter-protester sitting in an army jeep displays ignorance of history.

Full text of 2008 Nagasaki Peace Declaration

Full text of 2008 Nagasaki Peace Declaration

The following is the full text of the Peace Declaration issued by Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue at a memorial ceremony on Saturday, the 63rd anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city:

—–

We will not forget the atomic cloud that rose into the sky on that fateful day.

On August 9, 1945 at 11:02 a.m., a single atomic bomb dropped by a United States military aircraft exploded into an enormous fireball, engulfing the city of Nagasaki. Unimaginably intense heat rays, blast winds, and radiation; magnificent cathedral crumbling; charred bodies scattered amongst the ruins; people huddled in groups, their skin shredded by countless glass fragments, and the stench of death hung over the atomic wasteland.

Some 74,000 people perished and another 75,000 sustained terrible injuries. Those who somehow survived the blast suffered from poverty and discrimination, threatened even today by the physical and psychological damage caused by radiation exposure.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of the city of Nagasaki’s first Honorary Citizen, Dr. Takashi Nagai. Despite sustaining injuries in the atomic blast while at work at Nagasaki Medical College, Dr. Nagai devoted himself as a physician to the relief of the atomic bombing victims, and broadly conveyed the horror of the atomic bomb through written works such as “The Bells of Nagasaki,” even as he himself continued to suffer “radiation sickness.” Dr. Nagai once said, “There is no winning or losing in war; there is only ruin.” His words transcend time in reminding the world of the preciousness of peace and continue today to sound a warning to humankind.

The reverberations of a written appeal entitled “Toward a Nuclear-Free World” are being felt around the world. The authors of this appeal are four men who promoted nuclear policy under successive American presidents: former U.S. Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and George Schultz, former Secretary of Defense William Perry, and former Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sam Nunn.

These four men now promote their country’s ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and demand that the U.S. keeps the promises it agreed to at the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference, calling for the leaders of all the countries in possession of nuclear weapons to work intensively to reduce nuclear weapons with the common aim of creating a world without nuclear weapons.

These appeals mirror those that we have been making repeatedly in Nagasaki — the city that suffered the fate of an atomic bomb.

We made even stronger demands to the nuclear-weapon states. First of all, the U.S. and Russia must take the lead in striving to abolish nuclear weapons. These two countries, which together are said to possess 95 percent of the world’s nuclear warheads, should begin implementing broad reductions of nuclear weapons instead of deepening their conflict over, among others, the introduction of a missile-defense system in Europe. The United Kingdom, France, and China should also fulfill their responsibility to reduce nuclear arms with sincerity.

We also demand that the United Nations and international society do not ignore the nuclear weapons of North Korea, Pakistan, and Israel, as well as the suspicions of nuclear development by Iran, but take stern measures against these countries. Furthermore, India, whose nuclear cooperation with the U.S. is a cause of concern, should be strongly urged to join the NPT and CTBT.

Japan, as a nation that has experienced nuclear devastation, has a mission and a duty to take a leadership role in the elimination of nuclear weapons. To ensure the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, the Japanese Government must cooperate with international society to forcefully demand that North Korea completely destroys its nuclear arsenal. Moreover, based on the ideals of peace and renunciation of war prescribed in the Japanese Constitution, the Japanese government should realize the enactment of the Three Non-Nuclear Principles into law and seriously consider the creation of a “Northeast Asian Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone”.

In Nagasaki elderly victims of the atomic bombing tell the story of their experiences even as they continue to endure physical and psychological pain, while young people continue to present petitions calling for the abolishment of nuclear weapons to the United Nations under the slogan of “humble but not helpless.” As guides for peace, the citizens of Nagasaki stand at the site of nuclear devastation and convey the terrible realities of the atomic bombing. Medical workers respond sincerely to the health problems suffered by atomic bomb survivors over a lifetime.

Next year, the cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima will join together to host in Nagasaki the General Conference of Mayors for Peace, which has a membership of more than 2,300 cities worldwide. Banding together with cities around the world, we will undertake activities to promote nuclear disarmament in the run up to the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The city of Nagasaki is also strongly encouraging municipalities throughout Japan that have made anti-nuclear declarations to join us in widening the circle of these activities.

The use of nuclear weapons and war also destroys the global environment. Unless nuclear weapons are abolished, there is no future for humankind. We ask that the people of the world, young people and NGOs, shout out a clear “No!” to nuclear weapons.

Some 63 years have passed since the atomic bombing and the remaining survivors are growing old. We also demand that the Japanese government hastens to provide atomic bomb survivors, residing both in Japan and overseas, with support that corresponds with their reality.

I pray from my heart for the repose of the souls of those who died in the atomic bombing, and pledge to work untiringly for the elimination of nuclear weapons and for the achievement of everlasting world peace.

(Tomihisa Taue, Mayor of Nagasaki, August 9, 2008)

Nagasaki Commemorates Anniversary of Nuclear Attack

Nagasaki Commemorates Anniversary of Nuclear Attack

TOKYO  – Nagasaki on Saturday demanded North Korea fully abandon nuclear weapons, while urging India to sign nuclear treaties, as the Japanese city marked 63 years since it was flattened by an atomic bomb.0809 04 1

Thousands of people offered a minute’s silence at 11:02 am (0202 GMT), the exact moment the city was hit by the world’s second and last nuclear attack on August 9, 1945, killing more than 70,000 people.”As the victim of nuclear bombs, our country has a duty and responsibility for taking the initiative to eliminate nuclear weapons,” Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue told the ceremony.

“The Japanese government must strongly demand complete abolishment of nuclear weapons in North Korea,” Taue said, standing at the foot of the Peace Statue — a bronze figure of a man pointing to the sky.

“It should seriously consider the creation of a Northeast Asian nuclear weapon-free zone,” he said.

On Wednesday the people of Hiroshima held a remembrance to mark the 63rd anniversary of the first ever nuclear attack, which killed 140,000.

The dropping of the two bombs by the US was followed by Japan’s surrender in World War Two on August 15. However, it ushered in the nuclear age and an era of fear of the use of atomic bombs again.

Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, who flew from Beijing early Saturday after attending the opening ceremony of the Olympics, renewed his efforts to “spearhead” a global campaign against atomic bombs.

North Korea has agreed to abandon its nuclear programme in exchange for aid, but it is still uncertain if Pyongyang has completely met its promise to permanently dismantle its atomic plants and hand over all nuclear material and weaponry.

Taue also urged India to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) amid growing concerns over its atomic deal with the United States.

“India, whose nuclear cooperation with the United States is a cause of concern, should be strongly urged to join the NPT and CTBT,” Taue said.

India has been under international pressure over a controversial nuclear deal in which the United States will provide the energy-starved nation with civilian nuclear fuel and technology.

Japan has voiced concerns over the deal and urged New Delhi to sign the two treaties as soon as possible. Japan is a key member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group of 45 nations, which controls trade in nuclear fuel, material and technology to make sure they are used only for civilian purposes.

India needs a waiver from the group and ratification by the US Congress before the deal can go through.

Shigeko Mori, 72, who was 4.1 kilometres (2.5 miles) from the epicentre of the blast, recalled the horror, which killed her brother instantly and later took the lives of her parents and sisters who suffered radiation-related diseases.

“The devilish nuclear bomb blasted everything in a second,” Mori told the ceremony. “It was a deadly weapon that has also afflicted survivors for the rest of their lives.”

© 2008 Agence France Presse

Japan remembers Nagasaki atomic bomb victims

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan marked the 63rd anniversary of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki with a solemn ceremony on Saturday and a call for world powers to abandon their nuclear weapons.

Thousands of children, elderly survivors and dignitaries in the city’s Peace Park bowed their heads in a minute of silence at 11:02 a.m. (10:02 p.m. EDT), the time the bomb was dropped, to remember the tens of thousands who ultimately died from the blast.

“The United States and Russia must take the lead in striving to abolish nuclear weapons,” Nagasaki mayor Tomihisa Taue said at the gathering, which included Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda.

“These two countries … should begin implementing broad reductions of nuclear weapons instead of deepening their conflict over, among others, the introduction of a missile-defence system in Europe.”

Britain, France and China should also reduce their nuclear arms, he added.

About 27,000 of the southwestern city’s estimated 200,000 population died instantly from the bomb, and about 70,000 had died by the end of 1945.

Nagasaki was bombed by the United States on August 9, 1945, three days after the western city of Hiroshima, where the blast also killed tens of thousands immediately and many more later from radiation sickness.

On August 15, Japan surrendered, bringing World War Two to an end.

Fukuda said Japan had to fulfill its responsible role as a nation of peace

“I vow to lead the international community for permanent peace,” Fukuda said in a speech.

Nagasaki’s toll from the bomb, nicknamed “Fat Man”, is updated every year by the Japanese government which keeps a record of victims it says die of radiation illness. It added 3,058 names to the list this year, bringing the official death toll to 145,984.

Earlier in the week, the mayor of Hiroshima had criticized countries that refuse to abandon their bombs and vowed to do more to help survivors still suffering the city’s 1945 attack.

Japan has stood by its self-imposed “three non-nuclear principles” banning the possession, production and import of nuclear arms.

(Reporting by Taiga Uranaka; Editing by Valerie Lee)

Thousands remember atomic bombing of Nagasaki on 63rd anniversary

Thousands remember atomic bombing of Nagasaki on 63rd anniversary

People gather during a memorial ceremony at Nagasaki Peace Park on Saturday morning.

People gather during a memorial ceremony at Nagasaki Peace Park on Saturday morning.

NAGASAKI — Thousands of people including atomic bomb survivors gathered in Nagasaki on Saturday in a ceremony to mark the 63rd anniversary of the Aug. 9, 1945 atomic bomb attack on the city.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Takashi Nagai (1908-1951), a physician who cared for wounded survivors, or hibakusha, in spite of his own injures. In a Peace Declaration during the ceremony at Nagasaki Peace Park, near ground zero, Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue quoted Nagai, saying, “There is no winning or losing in war; there is only ruin.”

“There is no future for humans without the elimination of nuclear weapons,” Taue said. He requested that Japan continue to take a leading role in working toward the elimination of nuclear weapons and turning into law Japan’s three non-nuclear principles of neither possessing nor manufacturing nuclear weapons, nor permitting their introduction into Japan.

The ceremony began at 10:40 a.m., with about 5,650 people, including hibakusha, in attendance. Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda attended the ceremony, along with House of Representatives Speaker Yohei Kono, Health, Labor and Welfare Minister Yoichi Masuzoe, and representatives of eight countries.

Last year, representatives of 15 countries attended the ceremony, but the number dropped this year as a result of the Beijing Olympic Games that began on Friday.

Russia was the only country possessing nuclear weapons to be represented at the ceremony. The United States, which recently acknowledged that a small amount of radioactive cooling water leaked from the nuclear powered submarine USS Houston when it called at ports in Japan, did not make an appearance again this year.

At the beginning of the ceremony, three books containing the names of 3,058 hibakusha whose deaths were confirmed over the past year were enshrined in front of a peace memorial statue. With the addition, there are now 147 books containing the names of 145,984 people who have died.

At 11:02 a.m., the minute the bomb exploded over the city, ceremony participants held a moment of silence.

In a Peace Declaration read out at the ceremony Taue mentioned that people including former U.S. secretaries of state Henry Kissinger and George Schulz had submitted an article on steps toward a nuclear free world, adding that the authors were promoting the United States ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, calling for the elimination of nuclear weapons.

The declaration pointed out that Russia and the United States are said to together possess 95 percent of the world’s nuclear warheads and said these two countries “should begin implementing broad reductions of nuclear weapons.”

Speaking on hibakusha, whose average age passed 75 for the first time this year, the declaration urged the Japanese government to quickly provide atomic bomb survivors with “support that corresponds with their reality.”

In an address at the ceremony, Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, who flew in directly from Beijing after attending the Olympic Games opening ceremony, said Japan would hold fast to the three non-nuclear principles and take the forefront on the international stage to eliminate nuclear weapons and achieve lasting peace. He added that Japan would abide by recently introduced guidelines for recognizing hibakusha and provide recognition to as many people as possible.

A representative of atomic bomb survivors also called for the elimination of nuclear weapons, describing them as weapons that in an instant burn everything, claim hundreds of thousands of lives, and leave people suffering all their lives even if they manage to survive.

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/national/news/20080809p2a00m0na009000c.html

Nagasaki commemorates anniversary of nuclear attack

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The second US atomic bomb exploding on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945

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Nagasaki commemorates anniversary of nuclear attack

TOKYO (AFP) — Nagasaki on Saturday demanded North Korea fully abandon nuclear weapons, while urging India to sign nuclear treaties, as the Japanese city marked 63 years since it was flattened by an atomic bomb.

Thousands of people offered a minute’s silence at 11:02 am (0202 GMT), the exact moment the city was hit by the world’s second and last nuclear attack on August 9, 1945, killing more than 70,000 people.

“As the victim of nuclear bombs, our country has a duty and responsibility for taking the initiative to eliminate nuclear weapons,” Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue told the ceremony.

“The Japanese government must strongly demand complete abolishment of nuclear weapons in North Korea,” Taue said, standing at the foot of the Peace Statue — a bronze figure of a man pointing to the sky.

“It should seriously consider the creation of a Northeast Asian nuclear weapon-free zone,” he said.

On Wednesday the people of Hiroshima held a remembrance to mark the 63rd anniversary of the first ever nuclear attack, which killed 140,000.

The dropping of the two bombs by the US was followed by Japan’s surrender in World War Two on August 15. However, it ushered in the nuclear age and an era of fear of the use of atomic bombs again.

Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, who flew from Beijing early Saturday after attending the opening ceremony of the Olympics, renewed his efforts to “spearhead” a global campaign against atomic bombs.

North Korea has agreed to abandon its nuclear programme in exchange for aid, but it is still uncertain if Pyongyang has completely met its promise to permanently dismantle its atomic plants and hand over all nuclear material and weaponry.

Taue also urged India to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) amid growing concerns over its atomic deal with the United States.

“India, whose nuclear cooperation with the United States is a cause of concern, should be strongly urged to join the NPT and CTBT,” Taue said.

India has been under international pressure over a controversial nuclear deal in which the United States will provide the energy-starved nation with civilian nuclear fuel and technology.

Japan has voiced concerns over the deal and urged New Delhi to sign the two treaties as soon as possible. Japan is a key member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group of 45 nations, which controls trade in nuclear fuel, material and technology to make sure they are used only for civilian purposes.

India needs a waiver from the group and ratification by the US Congress before the deal can go through.

Shigeko Mori, 72, who was 4.1 kilometres (2.5 miles) from the epicentre of the blast, recalled the horror, which killed her brother instantly and later took the lives of her parents and sisters who suffered radiation-related diseases.

“The devilish nuclear bomb blasted everything in a second,” Mori told the ceremony. “It was a deadly weapon that has also afflicted survivors for the rest of their lives.”

AFP

Tuffy Ruth, An Insider’s Story

Tuffy Ruth, An Insider’s Story
The Downwinders

Terrie McArthur, Desert Valley Times • August 8, 2008

Tuffy Ruth is one of Mesquite’s originals. His dad’s family has been here since the beginning. He has ancestors that fought in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. His mother was an original settler in St. George. She too was a downwinder who died of leukemia.

Tuffy worked at the Nevada Test Site from 1961 to 1993 as a miner. The men that prepared the tunnels for the underground tests and worked on Yucca Mountain tunnels are all miners.

He witnessed the last aboveground test from Frenchman’s Flat. “I guess that makes me a downwinder too,” he said.

When asked if he had any health issues related to this work he replied, “As far as I know, none, yet. But most of the guys I worked with are gone.”

Tuffy doesn’t feel the government lied to us. “They knew it was bad. They just didn’t know how bad,” he said. “They gave us beer at the end of a shift to flush out our bodies. It didn’t work. They just got a bunch of drunken miners.” They didn’t know it wouldn’t work.

That might be the case. A letter from James E. Reeves, test site manager from 1962 to 1968 reads:

“JOINT TEST ORGANIZATION CAMP MERCURY, NEVADA

February, 1955

A MESSAGE TO PEOPLE WHO LIVE NEAR NEVADA TEST SITE:

You are in a very real sense active participants in the Nation’s atomic test program. You have been close observers of tests which have contributed greatly to building the defenses of our own country and of the free world.

“Nevada tests have helped us come a long way in a few, short years and have been a vital factor in maintaining the peace of the world. They also provide important data for use in planning civil defense measures to protect our people in event of enemy attack.

“Some of you have been inconvenienced by our test operations. At times some of you have been exposed to potential risk from flash, blast, or fall-out. You have accepted the inconvenience or the risk without fuss, without alarm, and without panic. Your cooperation has helped achieve an unusual record of safety.

“In a world in which free people have no atomic monopoly, we must keep our atomic strength at peak level. Time is a key factor in this task and Nevada tests help us ‘buy’ precious time.

That is why we must hold new tests in Nevada.

“I want you to know that in the forthcoming series, as has been true in the past, each shot is justified by national and international security need and that none will be fired unless there is adequate assurance of public safety.

“We are grateful for your continued cooperation and your understanding.”

Following this is information on the tests which is highly suspect as to the actual knowledge, or inclination to tell the truth, of those writing it.

This letter is the foreword on an information pamphlet concerning the test site, radiation and its effects written by the United States Atomic Energy Commission in 1955 and titled, “Atomic Test Effects In the Nevada Test Site Region.” Its contents are highly suspect.

Tuffy’s stance on the issue is somewhat the same. He feels that everything they did worked toward a more secure nation. “They kept the good and threw out the bad,” he said. Much of what they learned was used at NORAD in Colorado Springs.

As they dug the tunnels they developed drilling techniques that would be used the world over and that are still in use today. It was a “tunnel training pond.” Sandia developed equipment there such as a rock saw that greatly reduced the time it took to dig a tunnel.

At one time the Nevada Test Site employed 6,000 people. Many of them were miners. Tuffy commuted back and forth from Mesquite and saw every part of the test site at one time or another.

Mining has its own risks. Twice Tuffy was gassed by ammonia and once by highly concentrated carbon monoxide. The nuclear blasts turn the concrete lining the holes to ammonia — and he inhaled it. “I should be dead,” he said.

They did lose some men. It’s part of the job, but they instigated as many safety precautions as possible.

Many of the men he worked with, he had worked with on other jobs. As mines closed, such as the Climax mine, men gravitated to the test site and then they worked in the tunnels for Yucca Mountain.

The Department of Energy began studying Yucca Mountain in 1978 as a possible site for nuclear waste storage. In 1991, the State of Nevada granted the DOE the permits necessary to proceed with certain site characterization activities. These activities included excavating test pits and trenches, drilling bore holes, and monitoring ground water.

In September 1994, the DOE began excavation of the exploratory studies facility using a tunnel boring machine. Tuffy helped build the first 250 feet of Yucca Mountain.

The rest is history in the making. Yucca Mountain may or may not be the final resting place of our nuclear waste.

Tuffy did express concern over the fallout still in the desert. As we dig up the dirt and push it around for housing we are releasing some of that radiation. Alpha radiation takes 25,000 years to degrade; it can’t pass through clothing, but could be inhaled with dust, as could beta radiation.

And he did experience exposure to extreme radiation. Twice he experienced what they call “burnout,” exposure to more than 2,800 millarems in less than an hour. They always washed down after being in the mines; safety was an issue.

Tuffy is an original. He is proud of his work at the test site and proud of his country. Mistakes were made. Perhaps we can learn from the mistakes.

Dr. Benjamin Spock stated in a paper published in the 1980s titled Killing Our Own: “More than three and a half decades have now passed since the first atomic test at Alamogordo, New Mexico — July 16, 1945 — and the subsequent detonations at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

“Since then our own military has exploded more than 700 nuclear bombs on our own continental soil and in the Pacific. Many of the health effects are just now being felt.

“It seems no accident that we are currently suffering from a national cancer epidemic, in which one of every five Americans dies of that dread disease.

“It would be plausible and prudent to assume that the radioactive fallout we’ve introduced into the global atmosphere, literally tens of tons of debris from bomb tests alone, is a significant factor in addition to industrial pollution and cigarette smoking.

“As early as the 1950s the American Linus Pauling and the Russian Andrei Sakharov — both Nobel prize winners — warned that literally millions of people would die worldwide because of these bomb tests.

“Similar tragedies have struck American soldiers present at scores of bomb tests that followed. From 1945 through the early 1960s, some 300,000 men and women in U.S. uniform were exposed to radiation from atmospheric, underwater, and underground bomb tests.”

Include in these the stories of those who live near or work on nuclear reactors and those who cleaned up after Nagasaki and Hiroshima.

We have yet to understand the full impact of what nuclear reaction leaves behind. But we need to hear the stories of those affected so we can better understand our world and the way to peace.

8 Insane Nuclear Explosions

8 Insane Nuclear Explosions

July 21, 2008

A nuclear explosion occurs as a result of the rapid release of energy from an intentionally high-speed nuclear reaction. Below is 8 examples of this occurrence. Whether it be for testing, or the real the deal.

1.

These shots were taken July 3, 1970, by the French army in the Fangataufa atoll. Codenamed Canopus, it yielded 914 kt. Although this picture, like many of the series, is a work of the French Army (as far as I know) this is an original scan from a hardcopy, as processed to remove dust and scratches.

image sources from above pics

next 2 from wired

2.

Operation Upshot-Knothole, conducted at the Nevada Proving Ground between March 17 and June 4, 1953, consisted of 11 atmospheric tests: three airdrops, seven tower tests and one airburst. Upshot-Knothole involved the testing of new theories, using both fission and fusion devices.

House No. 1, located 3,500 feet from ground zero, was completely destroyed on the first day of testing. The elapsed time from the first picture to the last was 2⅔ seconds. The camera was completely enclosed in a 2-inch lead sheath as a protection against radiation. The only source of light was that from the detonation. Frame No. 1 (upper left) shows the house lighted by the blast. Frame No. 2 (upper right) shows the house on fire.

3. [below]

July 1, 1946, in the Marshall Islands: A mushroom cloud erupts in the North Pacific Ocean over the Bikini Lagoon during the first of the two detonations of Operation Crossroads. The series studied the effects of nuclear radiation on large ships, and the United States assembled a fleet of 90 obsolete naval vessels, including a few captured German and Japanese warships, for the test. Several ships can be seen here, silhouetted against the blast.

4. [below]

The Bravo test created the worst radiological disaster in US history. Due to failures in forecasting and analyzing weather patterns, failure to postpone the test following unfavorable changes in the weather, and combined with the unexpectedly high yield, the Marshallese Islanders on Rongelap, Ailinginae, and Utirik atolls were blanketed with the fallout plume along with U.S. servicemen stationed on Rongerik.

source

5. [below]

Trinity was the first test of technology for a nuclear weapon. It was conducted by the United States on July 16, 1945, at a location 35 miles southeast of Socorro, New Mexico, on what is now White Sands Missile Range, headquartered near Alamogordo. Trinity was a test of an implosion-design plutonium bomb. The Fat Man bomb, using the same conceptual design, was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, a few weeks later. The Trinity detonation was equivalent to the explosion of around 20 kilotons of TNT and is usually considered as the beginning of the Atomic Age.

source

6. [below]

BADGER was a 23 kiloton tower shot that was fired on April 18, 1953 at the Nevada Test Site, as part of the Operation Upshot-Knothole nuclear test series.

source

7&8. [below]

For those living under a gigantic rock the size of an apartment building: via wikipedia

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were nuclear attacks at the end of World War II against the Empire of Japan by the United States at the order of U.S. President Harry S. Truman on August 6 and 9, 1945. After six months of intense firebombing of 67 other Japanese cities, the nuclear weapon “Little Boy” was dropped on the city of Hiroshima on Monday, August 6, 1945, followed on August 9 by the detonation of the “Fat Man” nuclear bomb over Nagasaki.

The bombs killed as many as 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 80,000 in Nagasaki by the end of 1945, roughly half on the days of the bombings.

Nagasaki [below]

The exact moment of detonation at Nagasaki is captured in this remarkable photograph. Notice the three people in the foreground, as yet unaware that anything has happened. The destruction of Nagasaki followed that of Hiroshima by three days and compelled Japan to surrender, ending World War II. [below]

The Nagasaki bomb: codename fat man. 10,200 lbs, and a height of 10.6 feet [below]

Hiroshima [below]

The Hiroshima bomb: codename little boy. 8,818 lbs and a height of 9 feet [below]

Extra pic:

Taken 1 millisecond after detonation, showing the “Rope Trick” The spikes seen at the bottom of the detonation are caused by thermal radiation (approx 20,000 degrees Kelvin, 3 1/2 times hotter than the surface of the sun) vaporizing cables that held the device in place. This is known as the “Rope Trick”

The mottling effect seen on the surface of the fireball is caused by clumps of vaporized bomb debris, traveling at several tens of kilometers/second, hitting the back of the slower expanding fireball.

source

On a related note: I found this other wikipedia entry to be quite interesting…

Tip of the hat to:

http://picdit.wordpress.com/2008/07/21/8-insane-nuclear-explosions/

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