Shundahai Network Co-founder meets with President Obama (This is 7 years ago) but shows the continued interest in Global Warming and Indigenous Rights Issues that I write about today…

May 1May
19th

Shundahai Network Co-Founder Mateo gets to speak to President
Obama concerning issues with the CTBT. He also presented a
copy of “One Air, One Water, One Mother Earth”,
Corbin Harney’s first book.

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Alarms over radiation from thyroid cancer patients

Alarms over radiation from thyroid cancer patients
Cancer patients sent home after treatment with radioactive iodine have contaminated hotel rooms and set off alarms on public transportation, a congressional investigation has found.

They’ve come into close contact with vulnerable people, including pregnant women and children, and the household trash from their homes has triggered radiation detectors at landfills.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/20/AR2010102000655.html

BLACKJACK The Evil Nuclear Cartoon!

An Indian Prayer Christmas Day

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An Indian Prayer Christmas Day

Larry Kibby

Great Spirit Grandfather,
I send these words to you,
To Father Sun,
Grandmother Moon,
To all of my relations,
To Mother Earth,
And to the Four Winds
The Sacred Seasons of Life.

Grandfather,
Today you gave
The breath of Life
To an Indian Child,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
Will walk amongst
His people,
With his head held high,
With dignity and pride,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
Will stand before
His people,
With honor
And respect,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
Will be strong
With wisdom, knowledge
And understanding,
That will come from
The heart, soul and mind,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
Will come before
A humble Nation of people,
And like his relations
The Eagle and the Buffalo
Will be their strength
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
You gave to us in a sacred way,
And with his eyes
He will see all that is good,
And with his ears,
He will hear all that is good,
And the words he will speak
Will be strong and powerful,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
That you have brought before us,
Your Native American Indian people,
Will be like his Ancestor’s
That have gone before him
On their journey,
Will always travel
Within the Sacred Circle of Life
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child
Will use
His Eagle Feathers,
His Sacred Pipe,
His Sacred Cedar,
His Sacred Sage,
His Sacred Sweetgrass,
His Drums and Songs
In his Sacred Sun Dance,
In his Sacred Sweat Lodge,
In his Sacred Ceremonies,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
This Indian Child will be strong within,
His tradition, culture
And religion,
An intricate heritage,
In a most Sacred Way.

Grandfather,
Thank you for each breath of life
That you have given to our New Born,
For tomorrow,
Another Indian Child
Will be born the “Indian Way.”

http://www.firstpeople.us/html/An-Indian-Prayer-Christmas-Day.html

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How Native American Drums Play A Spiritual Role In Indigenous Culture

Read original article by clicking link below

How Native American Drums Play A Spiritual Role In Indigenous Culture

Native American drums are undeniably the most loved Native American instruments among Native and non Indian people alike. Drums for hundreds of years have always been at the center of Indian lifestyle, forming what is the channel of religion and spirituality as well as special days where a pow wow drum is center stage.

Indian tribes in North America history have all used drums in various ways to interact with a higher power known to most as the Great Spirit. To Native people, Indian drums are much more than just decorations or nice musical instruments. American Indian drums are thought to speak to the drummer. Native drums being made in a circle represent the earth and life. The most identifiable being hoop drums and shaman drums which are Indian hand drums used in many personal healing and religious ceremonies as well as public ceremonies such as a Native American powwow.

The hide of the animal that is stretched over the ring brings with it unique characteristics of the spirit of the animal and brings a sense of life to the drum when played. Many people think of beating a drum to make a sound, but to Native drummers and those involved in modern drumming groups and drum circles, the desire is to draw out the sound. The beating drum is compared to the beating of a human heart and is said to represent the heart beat of the earth which is a belief that is classic Native American. Drums in this way become the channel to connect one’s spirit with that of the earth and the Great Spirit through out the history of American Indians.

Native American Indian drums have a rich culture and because they are so important they are used in not only music but art and dance as well. Decorating a drum becomes a very personal artwork to the owner. The Indian drummer becomes an artist and communicates impressions of his inner feelings and beliefs in his Indian art. Some American Indian tribes use animals to adorn their drums and others use geometric patterns and everything in between. In some Native cultures the drummer will place an item of personal value inside the drum to permanently join himself with his hand drum.

The different Native American images that the artwork on the drums depict is usually painted with natural earth colors taken from nature. Some are dull and others are bright coming from flowers, roots, berries, bark or herbs that are boiled to release their unique earth tones. Other Native American drums are decorated with iron oxide which is a naturally occurring red rock that can be easily crushed. When mixed with water, it produces a rich orange red dye that is much like paint and is indicative if the surrounding hillsides and rock formations like those of the beautiful Arizona red rock canyons. The region of Sedona is thought to be a special place with spiritual power like the energy created by American Indian drums.

The goal of Native American Education except for those Indian boarding schools that have tried to stamp out Native culture has always involved the sharing of beliefs through music, songs, stories and legends. It is in harmony with these methods of learning that the communication and cultural importance has been found in the use of drums. If you are interested in the spiritual aspects of life as pertain to Indian beliefs, you will get a lot out of owning and playing Native American drums.

By: Craig Chambers

Timbisha Shoshone to Obama: Adopt UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Timbisha Shoshone to Obama: Adopt UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

November 5, 2009

The Honorable Barack Obama
The President of the United States of America
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20500-0004

Dear Mr. President,

Greetings. Upon this historical event, we wish to thank you for your commitment and dedication to bring forth meaningful change for our Peoples. On behalf of the Timbisha Shoshone of the Western Shoshone Nation and the many other Nations and Pueblos of Indigenous Peoples of North America, we call upon the government of the United States of America (USA) to act in due haste to adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), which was adopted by the UN General Assembly Resolution #61/295 at its 107th plenary on September 13, 2007.
We are confident that through your leadership and peacemaking goals as exemplified in your membership on the UN Human Rights Council, you will adopt this historic human rights instrument. We ask for this action immediately.

Mr. President, we write this in recognition of what we believe is your sincere commitment to uphold and strengthen the relationships with the US government and American Indian Nations. In keeping with your invitation to meet leaders of the Nations and Pueblos of Indigenous Peoples of North America which brings us to Washington DC, we offer our greetings to you and extend our hands in the spirit of a renewed and re-visioned expression of this relationship. A critical part of this relationship is recognizing that the time has come to break the chains from centuries of racism, colonization and ongoing oppression across North America. This can begin to be accomplished by the US adopting the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

We have entered a new age – a time of reflection and correcting the wrongs of previous eras. Let us set forth on a positive pathway together. As you know, thousands of Indigenous Peoples here in the US, and indeed throughout the world, stood up with trust and faith in your message of equity and justice for all, during your campaign. As Indigenous Peoples are equal to all other Peoples, it is time that the relationship of our Nations and Pueblos with the US must be redefined. This is more than a matter of honor. It is a matter of doing what is right and it is critical to our continuing and ever evolving relationship with the US federal government.
Mr. President, we believe in your commitment for real and systemic change that can imprint upon our future generations and lead the world in a good and honorable way. This can be accomplished by finally and for the first time ever, fully recognizing the rights of the Indigenous Nations.
Although an apology for the oppression of US policies that brutalized our homelands and have devastated our peoples, cultures and ecosystems, is well in order and in fact long overdue, it is not enough. Adopting the UNDRIP is a meaningful and responsible step toward long-term reconciliation that can resonate across the globe with Indigenous Peoples of the World.

The implementation of the UNDRIP institutes a new systemic standard that calls for complementary readjustment among entities of the government states and the Nations of the Indigenous Peoples, normalizing peaceful relations and creating partnerships based on mutual respect and cooperation.
Hopefully, this letter prompts the United States’ immediate attention to and adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We know this will produce a positive and constructive diplomatic venue to advance the recognition, respect, and protection of the Human Rights and Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples, both within the domestic and international arenas.
Sincerely,
Joe Kennedy
Chairman, Timbisha Shoshone of the Western Shoshone Nation

Posted by brendanorrell@gmail.com at 6:00 PM

Johnny Cash: Foe of hypocrisy

Johnny Cash: Foe of hypocrisy

The bitter tears of Johnny Cash
The untold story of Johnny Cash, protest singer and Native American activist, and his feud with the music industry

By Antonino D’Ambrosio
(Photo Johnny Cash with Bob Dylan)
(excerpt)
President Nixon to Johnny Cash: “Johnny, would you be willing to play a few songs for us,” Nixon asked Cash. “I like Merle Haggard’s ‘Okie From Muskogee’ and Guy Drake’s ‘Welfare Cadillac.'” The architect of the GOP’s Southern strategy was asking for two famous expressions of white working-class resentment.

“I don’t know those songs,” replied Cash, “but I got a few of my own I can play for you.” Dressed in his trademark black suit, his jet-black hair a little longer than usual, Cash draped the strap of his Martin guitar over his right shoulder and played three songs, all of them decidedly to the left of “Okie From Muskogee.” With the nation still mired in Vietnam, Cash had far more than prison reform on his mind. Nixon listened with a frozen smile to the singer’s rendition of the explicitly antiwar “What Is Truth?” and “Man in Black” (“Each week we lose a hundred fine young men”) and to a folk protest song about the plight of Native Americans called “The Ballad of Ira Hayes.” It was a daring confrontation with a president who was popular with Cash’s fans and about to sweep to a crushing reelection victory, but a glimpse of how Cash saw himself — a foe of hypocrisy, an ally of the downtrodden. An American protest singer, in short, as much as a country music legend.
Read article at Salon:
http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2009/11/08/johnny_cash/index.html