Land trust acquires 720 acres near Mount Rainier

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OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) – The Nisqually Land Trust has acquired 720 acres of timberland near the entrance to Mount Rainier National Park.
The group says the land from Hancock Timber Resource Group will provide critical habitat in the Kapowsin Forest for spotted owls, marbled murrelets, elk and other wildlife.
The state Department of Natural Resources will hold a conservation easement, preventing future development there.
The land cost nearly $2.6 million. Most of the money came from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service grant. The Nisqually Tribe also provided money and will help the trust manage natural resources on the site.

http://nativetimes.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1434&Itemid=1

Winning the war of energy words takes repetition

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Sen. Lamar Alexander likes talking about carbon. In the past two years he’s talked about carbon more than any other member of Congress.

Alexander, a Tennessee Republican, also uses the words “coal,” “renewable,” “climate” and “power” quite a bit. He is among the current and former members most likely to pepper their speech with energy- and environment-related words. The club also includes such familiar names as Sens. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.), Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Byron Dorgan (D-N.D.), Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and former senator and now Interior Secretary Ken Salazar of Colorado.

The leaders of energy and environment speak are found in a new Web site that put the bulk of nine years worth of the Congressional Record into a database. After tossing out words such as “and,” “in,” and “the,” the site allows users to search for which words are spoken and written most often and what words individual lawmakers say the most often. For energy and environmental topics, it reveals who spends the most time mentioning concepts as technical as “sequestration,” or as general as the word “land.”

http://www.nytimes.com/gwire/2009/04/21/21greenwire-winning-the-war-of-words-takes-repetition-10615.html


Uranium on its way out of Moab

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MOAB — After decades of controversy, a huge pile of radioactive waste near Moab is finally on the move. A train load of waste is expected to pull out of Moab Monday evening — the first of thousands of trains over the next decade or two.

The pile of red dirt blends into the red rock scenery so well, it’s hard to make out how big it is, but “big” is the word. There are 130 acres of uranium mill tailings, 16 million tons of radioactive waste.

Many Moab residents will be glad to get rid of it. “This is one of the happiest days in our town’s history, actually,” said Mayor David Sakrison.

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=6221870

‘Boatload’ of stimulus money not easy sailing for DOE contractors

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Steve Priest, vice president for business development at EnergySolutions, had one of the better quotes of the year at the March 31 Industry Day conference in Oak Ridge.

“The secret is out. The money is coming. It’s coming fast, and there’s a boatload of it,” Priest told a crowd of thirsty contractors at the sold-out conference (sponsored by the Energy, Technology and Environmental Business Association).

Priest was describing the stimulus money coming to Oak Ridge for environmental cleanup.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2009/apr/20/boatload-of-stimulus-money-not-easy-sailing-for/


DOE closing Oak Ridge incinerator–Remaining waste to be burned at unique OR facility before closure

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OAK RIDGE – At the end of April, the Department of Energy will stop receiving waste at its Oak Ridge incinerator and proceed with plans to shut down the one-of-a-kind facility.

The incinerator has burned more than 33 million pounds of waste over the past two decades, specializing in the treatment of so-called mixed wastes that contain radioactive elements, polychlorinated biphenyls and other hazardous chemicals.

On at least two occasions previously, DOE postponed plans to shut down the incinerator because of the backlog of wastes at Oak Ridge and other nuclear cleanup sites. But this time around, the incinerator’s closure appears to be a done deal.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2009/apr/20/doe-closing-incinerator/

There could be a few ants at the stimulus picnic

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No doubt some folks will do well with their stimulus contracts, but they’ll also be scrutinized like never before. That’s the topic of my column in the Knox Biz Journal.

http://blogs.knoxnews.com/knx/munger/2009/04/there_could_be_a_few_ants_at_t.html

TSCA Incinerator: Countdown to closure

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Story today on Knoxnews.com about Dept. of Energy’s plans to close the Oak Ridge incinerator, which has burned more than 33 million pounds of toxic waste over the past couple of decades.

The site will stop receiving waste at the end of April, with plans to burn the remaining stocks before the end of the federal year (Sept. 30), DOE spokesman said

http://blogs.knoxnews.com/knx/munger/2009/04/tsca_incinerator_countdown_to.html