“Days of action” campaign is over

The “days of action” campaign, which was directed at two enbridge pipeline projects in southern and northern Saskatchewan, came to an end a few days ago.

On Friday, October 4th, Chiefs from Treaty 4 and Treaty 6 First Nation communities met with representatives from Enbridge Pipelines Inc. to form what the Chiefs are calling “a new alliance.”

The details of the alliance have not been made public, but Edmund Bellegarde, a spokesperson for Treaty 4 Chiefs, says the company has promised to train and provide living allowances and transportation costs for an additional number of people than what the company initially presented.

More discussions are apparently going to take place over long-term benefits. “We’re looking at equity in future projects of this pipeline and other energy projects that Enbridge has and looking at some of their assets,” said Bellegarde. “We’re looking at long-term revenue streams, looking at securing some of those for Treaty 6 and Treaty 4 territorial communities.”

As well, the Saskatchewan government has said that is plans to meet with First Nations leaders at a Summit next month to discuss a range of issues, including the role of First Nations in the economy. “The summit comes out of First Minister and Metis Relations Minister June Draude’s participation in parts of the meeting Thursday between representatives of the First Nations and Enbridge,” explains the Saskatchewan News Network. “When asked, the minister would not rule out discussions at the meeting of a set share of resource revenue for First Nations, which was put forward by the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations this spring to a cool reception from Premier Brad Wall,” the article continues.

Disappointing Days

While it’s great that something positive has come from this campaign, one can’t help but feel disillusioned by it. After all, we were told it was going to usher in “a new era of first nations relations with the Crown.”

Instead of establishing a new relationship, it has done nothing but reinforce the old one. That’s made evident by the way Enbridge and Province are handling the treaty nations — as second-rate Canadians that are entitled to little more than a few short term jobs and maybe a new-and-improved hand-me-down economy.

Honestly, I can’t help but wonder if the whole thing was just a front, like the infamous “day of action” that was organized last year by the Assembly of First Nations (which exploited and alienated us so they could get more money).

I hope this isn’t the case, I hope all that wasn’t just talk.

http://intercontinentalcry.org/days-of-action-campaign-is-over/

How hot is too hot?

How hot is too hot?
Panel questions methods on Yankee radiation standards
October 9, 2008

MONTPELIER — The public was short-changed last year when the Department of Health changed the way it calculated the radiation coming from the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant and didn’t hold public hearings on the issue, members of a legislative panel said Wednesday.

Last year, the Department of Health started using a “conversion factor” of 0.6 on any measured radiation coming from the plant, noting that science showed that not all radiation is absorbed by the human body. The change has made it easier for Vermont Yankee to meet the state’s radiation emission limits, which are the strictest in the country.

Vermont Yankee’s radiation emissions have been rising, because of the recent power uprate and its practice of injecting noble gases into its steam system in an effort to reduce corrosion.

Officials from the Department of Health maintained that the change wasn’t a rule change, and thus it didn’t need to go through the formal review process, including going before the Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules and holding public hearings on the changes.

Previously, the state calculated that any exposure was the same as the radiation dose, which isn’t really correct, William Irwin, the chief of Vermont’s radiological health division, told the panel. Irwin said the 0.6 factor was “better science.”

Without the change, it was likely that Vermont Yankee would have exceeded its state limit of 20 millirems of gamma radiation a year released from the plant, since the figure now ranges around 17 to 18 millirems, Irwin said.

Rep. Richard Marek, D-Newfane, chairman of the panel, questioned Irwin on why the state didn’t initiate enforcement proceedings against Entergy Nuclear when it exceeded the 20 millirem level in 2004. And he reminded state health officials that by law their primary responsibility was to “reduce exposure” to the general public.

Instead, the state initiated discussions with Entergy Nuclear, hired an out-of-state consultant on nuclear issues, Oak Ridge University Associates, and came up with a different way of calculating the radiation dose.

“Exposure must be converted to dose,” said Irwin, who started working for the state in 2005.

But Marek produced a letter from former Health Commissioner Sharon Moffatt dated February 2007, stating exposure equaled dose, the only way of calculating the radiation.

Without the change, Marek noted, “the uprate wouldn’t have occurred.”

Irwin and Health Commissioner Dr. Wendy Davis had no real answer for why the department had originally issued a press release in the winter of 2007 announcing the change and acknowledging the fact that it had to go through the formal review process.

Davis only joined the department in July.

Irwin said after the four-hour hearing at the Statehouse that it was a busy time for the Department of Health and such a change didn’t require a correction to the public.

Irwin said at least two recent operational changes at Vermont Yankee boosted its radiation releases — the 20 percent power boost or uprate, and the 2001 decision to inject noble gases in the plant’s steam lines as a way of stopping corrosion.

The radiation levels will only climb more, Irwin said, because Entergy Nuclear started storing high-level radioactive waste outside the plant in concrete and steel casks, which will emit more radiation into the atmosphere.

Irwin said Entergy Nuclear had recently started buying homes around the nuclear reactor and would be able to move its boundary fence farther away from the plant, further reducing the radiation readings.

He told the panel the readings on the east side of the plant, along the boundary of the Connecticut River, regularly exceeded Vermont state limits, but because it was a state boundary with New Hampshire, New Hampshire’s standards applied.

New Hampshire adopted the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit of 100 millirems a year, which is five times the Vermont limit, which was adopted back in 1970.

That highest fenceline reading is about 78 millirems a year because it is closer to the plant, he said.

The western boundary, which is close to the Vernon Elementary School, registers calculations of between 17 and 18 millirems. Most of the gamma radiation coming from Vermont Yankee comes from its turbines, which are on the school side of the plant. The plant has installed special shielding to reduce the gamma radiation coming from the turbines, he said.

The legislators recessed the hearing without finishing their questioning of Irwin or other people who were slated to testify about the problem.

Sen. Mark MacDonald, D-Orange, a member of the committee as well as the Vermont State Nuclear Advisory Panel and the person who initiated the discussion, said he still hadn’t had his questions answered about why the Department of Health changed the way it calculated radiation doses, and why it didn’t let the public know about it.

Irwin maintained that the Department of Health had a workshop with the Windham Regional Commission in November 2006 about the change.

Sen. Diane Snelling, R-Chittenden, said her concerns were not about Irwin’s science, but on the process, or lack of it, in adopting the changes.

Contact Susan Smallheer at susan.smallheer@rutlandherald.com.

How hot is too hot?
Panel questions methods on Yankee radiation standards
October 9, 2008

MONTPELIER — The public was short-changed last year when the Department of Health changed the way it calculated the radiation coming from the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant and didn’t hold public hearings on the issue, members of a legislative panel said Wednesday.

Last year, the Department of Health started using a “conversion factor” of 0.6 on any measured radiation coming from the plant, noting that science showed that not all radiation is absorbed by the human body. The change has made it easier for Vermont Yankee to meet the state’s radiation emission limits, which are the strictest in the country.

Vermont Yankee’s radiation emissions have been rising, because of the recent power uprate and its practice of injecting noble gases into its steam system in an effort to reduce corrosion.

Officials from the Department of Health maintained that the change wasn’t a rule change, and thus it didn’t need to go through the formal review process, including going before the Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules and holding public hearings on the changes.

Previously, the state calculated that any exposure was the same as the radiation dose, which isn’t really correct, William Irwin, the chief of Vermont’s radiological health division, told the panel. Irwin said the 0.6 factor was “better science.”

Without the change, it was likely that Vermont Yankee would have exceeded its state limit of 20 millirems of gamma radiation a year released from the plant, since the figure now ranges around 17 to 18 millirems, Irwin said.

Rep. Richard Marek, D-Newfane, chairman of the panel, questioned Irwin on why the state didn’t initiate enforcement proceedings against Entergy Nuclear when it exceeded the 20 millirem level in 2004. And he reminded state health officials that by law their primary responsibility was to “reduce exposure” to the general public.

Instead, the state initiated discussions with Entergy Nuclear, hired an out-of-state consultant on nuclear issues, Oak Ridge University Associates, and came up with a different way of calculating the radiation dose.

“Exposure must be converted to dose,” said Irwin, who started working for the state in 2005.

But Marek produced a letter from former Health Commissioner Sharon Moffatt dated February 2007, stating exposure equaled dose, the only way of calculating the radiation.

Without the change, Marek noted, “the uprate wouldn’t have occurred.”

Irwin and Health Commissioner Dr. Wendy Davis had no real answer for why the department had originally issued a press release in the winter of 2007 announcing the change and acknowledging the fact that it had to go through the formal review process.

Davis only joined the department in July.

Irwin said after the four-hour hearing at the Statehouse that it was a busy time for the Department of Health and such a change didn’t require a correction to the public.

Irwin said at least two recent operational changes at Vermont Yankee boosted its radiation releases — the 20 percent power boost or uprate, and the 2001 decision to inject noble gases in the plant’s steam lines as a way of stopping corrosion.

The radiation levels will only climb more, Irwin said, because Entergy Nuclear started storing high-level radioactive waste outside the plant in concrete and steel casks, which will emit more radiation into the atmosphere.

Irwin said Entergy Nuclear had recently started buying homes around the nuclear reactor and would be able to move its boundary fence farther away from the plant, further reducing the radiation readings.

He told the panel the readings on the east side of the plant, along the boundary of the Connecticut River, regularly exceeded Vermont state limits, but because it was a state boundary with New Hampshire, New Hampshire’s standards applied.

New Hampshire adopted the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit of 100 millirems a year, which is five times the Vermont limit, which was adopted back in 1970.

That highest fenceline reading is about 78 millirems a year because it is closer to the plant, he said.

The western boundary, which is close to the Vernon Elementary School, registers calculations of between 17 and 18 millirems. Most of the gamma radiation coming from Vermont Yankee comes from its turbines, which are on the school side of the plant. The plant has installed special shielding to reduce the gamma radiation coming from the turbines, he said.

The legislators recessed the hearing without finishing their questioning of Irwin or other people who were slated to testify about the problem.

Sen. Mark MacDonald, D-Orange, a member of the committee as well as the Vermont State Nuclear Advisory Panel and the person who initiated the discussion, said he still hadn’t had his questions answered about why the Department of Health changed the way it calculated radiation doses, and why it didn’t let the public know about it.

Irwin maintained that the Department of Health had a workshop with the Windham Regional Commission in November 2006 about the change.

Sen. Diane Snelling, R-Chittenden, said her concerns were not about Irwin’s science, but on the process, or lack of it, in adopting the changes.

Contact Susan Smallheer at susan.smallheer@rutlandherald.com.

No cheating allowed.

OAK RIDGE — No cheating allowed.

Y-12 officials confirmed that warhead assembly operations were suspended earlier this year after it was learned that a worker used handwritten crib notes — a violation of procedures — to help recall the size of parts.

An error reportedly occurred during the assembly operation as a direct result of the operator using the cheat sheet. The worker had copied the part sizes from a specification sheet for a different nuclear weapons unit than the one actually being put together.

The incident at the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant was reported in an Aug. 15 memo by staff of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The memo was among several recently posted on the board’s Web site after passing through a review for classified information.

Ellen Boatner, a spokeswoman for Y-12 contractor B&W Technical Services, called the incident “an isolated situation” and said it was self-reported by the operator.

No problems were found with the part involved, and work has since resumed in that area of the plant, Boatner said.

“The crib sheet was referred to during the operation rather than the formal specification,” the defense board memo said. “A contributing factor was that work control processes (at Y-12) allow the operator to handle several specification sheets for different weapon builds as opposed to requiring handling of only the specification sheets for the specific unit being assembled.”

In an earlier memo, defense board representatives said they had observed assembly operations where one worker did the job inside an “environmental room” while a second worker read the procedure over a headset communications system. The board reps said some of the procedural steps were not read verbatim, and they suggested that those practices could lead to “imprecise execution.”

Boatner would not comment on whether the worker was disciplined. She also would not comment on which weapon system was involved, although the incident occurred at about the same time Y-12 announced completion of the first production unit for refurbished W76 warheads.

W76 warheads are deployed aboard Trident missile systems on submarines.

Y-12 historically has manufactured parts for every nuclear weapon in the U.S. arsenal. The plant also disassembles those same parts after weapon systems are retired from deployment or are returned to the weapons complex for refurbishment.

The Oak Ridge facility specializes in so-called secondaries — the second stage of thermonuclear weapons.

Steven Wyatt, a spokesman for the National Nuclear Security Administration, said federal overseers agreed that the use of crib sheets at Y-12 was an isolated situation. He said “appropriate training” has been performed to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

“We consider the matter to be closed,” Wyatt said.

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2008/oct/09/nuke-worker-used-crib-sheet-during-warhead-assembl/

Activist To Speak On Nuclear Age

Activist To Speak On Nuclear Age

By Shereen Oca
Staff Writer

Activist To Speak On Nuclear Age

But despite such dire diagnoses, Caldicott remains resilient and is armed with remedies.

“If we get a sparkling new president like (Barack) Obama, he can take the lead,” Caldicott said. “In five years, we can abolish the weapons between Russia and America. And other countries will be morally forced to follow because this is a morality issue.”

Caldicott also said she believes that every reactor in the nation can be closed down. She has been commissioned a study called “Carbon-Free and Nuclear-Free: A Roadmap for U.S. Energy Policy” by the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research. This policy has the entire nation running on carbon- and nuclear-free energy by 2050, including transportation.

Caldicott’s knowledge and expertise are the reasons why organizers of the First Congregational Church contacted her in the first place. According to Edric F. Guise, communications committee chair at First Congregational, they were looking for ways to connect to the community regarding issues of peace and national security, and Caldicott seemed a perfect fit.

In addition to spreading her message internationally, Caldicott is a co-founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, a network of doctors committed to educating their peers about the hazards of nuclear age. It’s an organization under the umbrella of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize winner, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. (Caldicott herself was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize by Nobel Laureate Linus Pauling.) She also has been named one of the most influential women in the 20th Century by the Smithsonian Institute and has penned seven books, “War in Heaven” being her most recent.

“She’s one of those whirling dervishes,” Guise said. “It’s hard to describe her. She is a woman who has a great deal of influence because of her continued activism.”

Guise mentions that while the nation spends billions of dollars on nuclear weapons, college fees are increasing, school budgets are decreasing, and people are starting to notice.

“It’s eye-opening,” Guise said. “It’s really important that we take a look at this. We get complacent…. I certainly hope that we have the leadership to navigate through (this) with the next president.”

Caldicott’s speech will begin at 2 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The First Congregational Church is at 241 Cedar Ave. For details, call 436-2256 or go to http://www.FirstChurchLB.org.

http://www.gazettes.com/speaker10092008.html

Nuclear Waste Answer Needed

America’s realization that it must kick its expensive foreign-oil habit has energized the previously moribund nuclear power industry, which is proudly selling itself as the cheaper, cleaner alternative.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is considering at least a dozen applications for new power plants, and it expects to receive 23 more applications within two years.

Nuclear power should be included in the panoply of preferred alternatives to fossil fuels – along with wind, solar, geothermal, hyrdroelectric energy and anything else that weans the nation from its $700-billion-a-year taste for foreign oil.

The experiences of both Europe and our own country over the past two decades have shown that nuclear power can be provided much more safely than when the words Three Mile Island or Chernobyl would stifle any mention of building new plants in the United States.

But while plant safety may have improved greatly, there has been little progress on solving the overarching problem of where to put radioactive waste – the lethal leftovers that can remain dangerous to health and life for centuries.

Six years ago, Congress approved a plan to transport waste from nuclear plants to Nevada’s Yucca Mountain. But it was only four months ago that the Department of Energy submitted a waste repository application to the NRC. If approved, the first waste shipment isn’t expected to be sent to Yucca before 2020.

Meanwhile, the 64,000 tons of spent fuel now being stored on-site at nuclear power plants in 33 states will continue to grow.

But America’s nuclear-waste problem is much more pervasive than that. It involves not just what the nation’s existing power plants produce, but also the low-level radioactive material found in hospitals, universities and in other industries.

There are only three commercial landfills in the nation authorized to receive this material, and one of them, in Barnwell, has closed its doors to all but three states. A facility in Hanford, Wash., accepts low-level waste from 11 states. The remaining 36 states have only one place to turn – a disposal site 80 miles west of Salt Lake City.

EnergySolutions, operator of the Tooele County, Utah, facility, isn’t satisfied with being the biggest recipient of low-level waste in the nation. The rest of the world offers lots of customers with the same problem.

EnergySolutions has filed a lawsuit to void the rejection of its proposal to import 20,000 tons of radioactive waste from Italy. The rejection came from the Northwest region’s radioactive waste-management authority, but EnergySolutions argues the agency exceeded its jurisdiction.

The company may be right. That’s why there’s an effort in Congress to ban the import of nuclear waste from foreign countries. Seems like a no-brainer, but critics point out that accepting the premise that nuclear waste should stay where it is generated sets a bad legal precedent for states that want to ship their glowing garbage cross-country.

The Utah situation is just more evidence that our nation must get a better grip on handling nuclear waste if it is determined to increase its reliance on nuclear energy

http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/opinion/story/624985.html

Depleted uranium company eyes two Idaho sites

A small eastern Idaho company aiming to build a $55 million plant in the West to extract industrial gases from depleted uranium has narrowed its search to four sites, including two in Idaho.

International Isotopes Inc. Chief Executive Officer Steve Laflin said one of the Idaho sites is near Idaho Falls, where France’s Areva NC Inc. plans a $2 billion uranium enrichment plant. The other Idaho site hasn’t been disclosed.

The company also is considering sites in Lea County, N.M., where an Areva rival is building a separate uranium enrichment plant, and in nearby Andrews County, Texas.

Laflin has said his proposed plant could be anywhere on transportation routes between uranium enrichment plants that produce depleted uranium and the facilities where uranium waste is disposed. The four locations all promise a steady supply of depleted uranium hexafluoride, from which International Isotopes would extract high-value germanium fluoride gas needed for applications including etching silicon for microelectronics.

International Isotopes’ plans are a sign uranium enrichment projects like Areva’s or the one being built in New Mexico by European consortium Urenco could be economic development magnets for related businesses.

http://www.idahostatesman.com/business/story/528642.html

McCain Still Lying? You Betcha!

McCain Still Lying?  You Betcha!

Fri Oct 10, 2008 at 07:20:01 AM PDT

Now he’s praising Palin’s prayer pipeline.  During an interview with Sean Hannity Wednesday night, with Sarah Palin at his side, McCain:

… claimed that Palin “was responsible for…a pipeline, the $40 billion pipeline bringing natural gas from Alaska down to the lower 48.”

The pipeline is fiction.  No matter how much anyone may be praying for it (doggone it, Palin said it’s “God’s will”), construction still hasn’t begun:

When Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska took center stage at the Republican convention last week, she sought to burnish her executive credentials by telling how she had engineered the deal that jump-started a long-delayed gas pipeline project.

Stretching more than 1,700 miles, it would deliver natural gas from the North Slope of Alaska to the lower 48 states and be the largest private-sector infrastructure project on the continent.

“And when that deal was struck, we began a nearly $40 billion natural gas pipeline to help lead America to energy independence,” said Ms. Palin, the Republican vice-presidential nominee. “That pipeline, when the last section is laid and its valves are opened, will lead America one step farther away from dependence on dangerous foreign powers that do not have our interests at heart.”

The pipeline exists only on paper. The first section has yet to be laid, federal approvals are years away and the pipeline will not be completed for at least a decade. In fact, although it is the centerpiece of Ms. Palin’s relatively brief record as governor, the pipeline might never be built, and under a worst-case scenario, the state could lose up to $500 million it committed to defray regulatory and other costs.

Here’s the video:

Stop lying, John McCain.  Just because Sarah Palin says something, doesn’t make it true.  And no, she isn’t an “energy expert“.

Next, maybe McCain will be telling us that dinosaurs and humans co-existed, because Sarah Palin said so, after all.

http://www.dailykos.com/

Hungary inaugurates permanent waste repository

Hungary inaugurates permanent waste repository
09 October 2008

Bataapati

Bataapati during development (Image: Puram)

The Bataapati facility will hold most of the radioactive wastes from the nuclear power plant that provides over one third of Hungary’s electricity.

The inauguration took place on 6 October, marking the start of operations at surface storage and control facilities. Construction has begun on underground disposal vaults which should eventually hold all the low-level and short-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LILW) resulting from the operation and decommissioning of the Paks nuclear power plant.

The small volume of long-lived ILW and high-level wastes will be managed separately.

Bataapati, 180 kilometres from Budapest, was selected from some 300 potential locations after a 15-year selection and development process that involved nine different government agencies. Final approval was given by parliament in 2005, following a local referendum which saw 75% of the local community participate and a 90% favourable response. In the wider region, acceptance is 60%.

Paks is Hungary’s only nuclear generating site, with four VVER-440 pressurized water reactors. The first of the four reactors is due to be closed in 2012 with the others following before 2020, resulting in a total stockpile of 40,000 m3 of LILW for disposal after dismantling the plant. However, there is a high probability of 20-year life extensions to the Paks units, and this possibility as well as that of Hungary building new reactors has been factored into the modular design of Bataapati.

Waste drums will be stacked at a depth of 200-250 metres below the surface (0-50 metres above sea level) inside caverns within the granite bedrock. Studies have shown this bedrock is composed of large blocks separated from one another by impermeable clayish deformation zones with very low levels of groundwater movement – just a few centimetres per year. “By virtue of the deep location and the hydro-geological conditions, the proposed concept of subsurface disposal is not affected significantly by changes in the environment,” Peter Ormai of Hungary’s waste management company, Puram, told World Nuclear News.

The disposal caverns, accessed via a pair of inclined tunnels, will be back-filled with a combination of clay and concrete with 50-60% crushed granite, which is intended to retain any radioactive isotopes that may escape from waste packages over the long term. The facility is designed to make it possible to retrieve all the waste packages until it is finally closed.

The first phase of the project will see three pairs of LILW caverns constructed. The repository will then be extended so that the more active waste is isolated in one particular bedrock block. The repository will be operated automatically, with a closed-line camera network sending signals to the surface control room.

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/WR_Hungary_inaugurates_permanent_waste_repository_0910081.html

Low-level radiation at Hanford tied to risk of fatal leukemia, study says

Low-level radiation at Hanford tied to risk of fatal leukemia, study says

A new study of Hanford and other nuclear-defense-site workers found exposure to low levels of radiation slightly increased the risk that workers would die of leukemia.

Tri-City Herald

KENNEWICK — A new study of Hanford and other nuclear-defense-site workers found exposure to low levels of radiation slightly increased the risk that workers would die of leukemia.

The study was conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a federal research agency, and looked at doses that a worker at a nuclear site might receive over a lifetime of work. Previous studies that look at a correlation between exposure and leukemia typically have looked at higher levels of exposure, according to NIOSH.

In the United States, 71 of every 10,000 men can expect to die from leukemia. The study indicated that for workers who were exposed to 3 rem of radiation in the workplace the risk of dying from leukemia increased to 77 men out of 10,000.

“We emphasize that if workers are exposed to three rem, the risk is very low,” said Mary Schubauer-Berigan, a NIOSH epidemiologist.

The study looked at workers exposed to more than 1 rem and compared their rate of dying from leukemia to those exposed to less than 1 rem. The average exposure for those who had more than 1 rem of radiation was 6 rem. Overall, 3 rem was an average exposure for those in the study.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) limits radiation exposure to 5 rem per year, but in practice the radiation exposure is controlled to less than 0.5 rem a year, said DOE spokesman Geoff Tyree.

The average person is exposed to about 0.15 rem a year from natural sources of ionizing radiation, excluding radon, which has not been linked to leukemia, said Schubauer-Berigan.

Studies more commonly have looked at high doses of radiation in groups such as Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, medical patients who receive radiation and nuclear workers in the former Soviet Union. But the results of the new study are consistent with those studies in finding that the risk of death from leukemia increases uniformly as the amount of exposure increases, Schubauer-Berigan said.

The study looked at records for five federal sites: Hanford; Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico; Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in New Hampshire; and Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

Between the 1940s and 1990s, a total of 94,517 workers were monitored at the sites for radiation exposure. A search of death certificates found 257 died of radiation, but the study included only the 249 for whom the type of leukemia was clear.

Each worker was matched with four other workers who were the same age and were employed at sites in the study but who did not die from leukemia.

Radiation exposure was estimated for all workers, and smoking and exposure to benzene and carbon tetrachloride were taken into account, Schubauer-Berigan said

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2008242697_hanford09.html

Shipment from Plymouth nuclear plant exceeded radiation levels

The Patriot Ledger
Posted Oct 08, 2008 @ 07:39 AM

BRATTLEBORO, Vt. —

Federal nuclear inspectors are looking into why a shipment of lead shielding from the Pilgrim nuclear station in Plymouth to the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant had higher than allowed radiation levels.

The lead shielding is used to protect workers during refueling outages. Both Pilgrim and Yankee are owned by Entergy.

“(Workers) checked it thoroughly before it left Pilgrim,” said Neil Sheehan, spokesman for the Nuclear Regulatory Commision. In Plymouth, radiation levels were below federal limits, he said.

But when the package arrived in Vermont, it had radiation readings of between 1.3 and 1.8 millirems emitted per hour. The federal limit is 0.5 millirems. The average person is exposed to roughly 360 millirems of radiation per year.

Exactly why the radiation reading was higher when the package reached Vermont is not yet known, Pilgrim spokesman David Tarantino told the Brattleboro Reformer.

“We are pretty darn careful about the shipping of this stuff,” Tarantino told the Vermont newspaper.

http://www.patriotledger.com/news/x116904676/Shipment-from-Plymouth-nuclear-plant-exceeded-radiation-levels

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