Native Americans still fighting ignorance at Plimoth

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PLIMOTH PLANTATION, Massachusetts (CNN) — Modern-day pilgrims to Plimoth Plantation have much curiosity about life in the re-creation of an English village from the 1600s and a Native American homesite. But some of the thousands of people who visit daily to get a glimpse of how the first colonials existed and created the Thanksgiving tradition bring with them misconceptions about the Native people.


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Paula Peters, of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, said one of the first things she learned when she started working at Plimoth in Massachusetts 30 years ago was: “People will say things that will hurt you.”

A parent might reprimand their children by saying, “If you don’t behave I am going to leave you with this Indian squaw and she will cook you for dinner,” Peters said.

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/TRAVEL/11/28/plimoth.native.americans/

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