Arizona Tribe’s Suit Over Research Revived

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PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona appeals court panel ruled Friday that the Havasupai American Indian tribe can proceed with a lawsuit that claims university researchers misused blood samples taken from tribal members.

Overturning a judge’s 2007 dismissal of the case, a split Arizona Court of Appeals panel said Havasupai Native Americans and other plaintiffs had provided enough information to go to trial or at least enough to go forward in trial court pending further proceedings.

The northern Arizona tribe, whose isolated village lies deep in a gorge off the Grand Canyon, claims Arizona State University and University of Arizona researchers misused blood samples taken from more than 200 tribal members for diabetes research in the 1990s by also using it for research into schizophrenia, inbreeding and ancient population migration.

Read more on Reznews

Economic crisis impacts North American mines

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The partners in the Midwest joint venture in Saskatchewan, Canada, have announced their decision to postpone the uranium mine project due to current economic conditions. Denison has also suspended operations at the Tony M mine in Utah, USA.

The partners in the Midwest project – Areva Resources Canada (69.16%), Denison Mines Corp (25.17%) and OURD Canada Co (5.67%) – announced in December 2007 the formal decision to proceed with development of the project.
However, Denison announced that the partners have now decided the postponement the project due to the “current economic climate, delays and uncertainties associated with the regulatory approval process, the increasing capital and operating costs and the current market for uranium.” The company said that, based on current estimates, capital costs have increased by some 50% from the previous estimate of C$435 million ($355 million).

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/ENF-Economic_crisis_impacts_North_American_mines-2611084.html

Fishing for a Blessing

Please read article, cited after the quote. Articles open in a new window.The crowd faced south across the turquoise sea. Sage smoke mixed in the salty air as the breeze rushed it toward the fishing ships moored in Trinidad Bay.

”God,” said Axel Lindgren, a sixth-generation Yurok tribal member, “protect these fishermen and women who go out and get the crab.”

Lindgren’s traditional prayer, which originated from the ancient Yurok village of Tsuri, located in what is now Trinidad, was given as part of the 13th annual Blessing of the Fleet, an event that brings hundreds of people to the small fishing community’s anchorage on Thanksgiving morning.

http://www.times-standard.com/localnews/ci_11093197

Tribe questions Wagner hog farm’s water use

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MARTY, S.D. (AP) – The Yankton Sioux Tribe is asking whether a big hog farm west of Wagner needs a commercial permit to use ground water.

The state Water Management Board is scheduled to take up the question Dec. 11.

Longview Farm is owned by 11 Iowa farmers. At full production it will turn out 70,000 pigs a year.

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/articles/2008/11/29/news/latest_news/doc493174282589b981330890.txt

Lawyer urges Indian sovereignty review

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— An Oklahoma attorney is urging the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the legal doctrine of sovereign immunity for Indian tribes in light of the increasing expansion of tribes into business operations.

Jonathan Neff, whose clients sued the Seneca-Cayuga tribe’s cigarette company in Grove, Okla., said tribal sovereign immunity leaves companies doing business with tribes with no legal recourse when disputes arise.

He said that is the consequence of a decision last week by a federal appeals court in Denver unless the high court revises the tribal immunity doctrine.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2008/nov/29/lawyer-urges-indian-sovereignty-review/

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Judges to hear Native, federal appeals in Interior trust suit

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A U.S. Court of Appeals panel of judges has agreed to grant an appeal made by both Native landowners and the Interior Department as part of a 12-year-long lawsuit supposedly brought to an end by a federal court ruling this summer.

It was announced on Friday that three circuit judges agreed to grant hearings in the Cobell vs. Kempthorne lawsuit.

Elouise Cobell, lead plaintiff from Browning, said she hoped the Court of Appeals would expedite the date for both sides to make oral arguments because “too many people have been dying,” referring to elders represented in the class-action suit who will never receive their share of a monetary award settlement.

An Interior Department spokesman was not available for comment.

http://www.missoulian.com/articles/2008/11/29/jodirave/rave05.txt

Electrical fault shuts down Oyster Creek nuclear plant

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LACEY TOWNSHIP – Oyster Creek Generating Station automatically shut down Friday night, a station official confirmed Saturday.

At 9:05 p.m., the station suffered an electrical fault in one of its two main transformers, which are used to convert Oyster Creek’s output for use on the gird that serves the region.

The automatic shutdown occurred safely and without incident, according to David Benson, a spokesman for the plant.

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/183/story/331396.html

Don’t build new nuclear plants

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During the presidential campaign John McCain stated that a partial solution to the energy crises would be to build 45 new nuclear plants. The suggestion did not generate a dialogue among either party and for good reason. There has not been a new nuclear plant built in the United States for 28 years.

As a result, we have no nuclear “equipment” to technology supply source. Even if it was agreed to build one, it would take a half dozen years, to “tool up” to buy the necessary “hardware.”

McCain mentioned that France gets 40 percent of its energy from a nuclear source. He neglected to mention that France hasn’t built a nuclear plant for over 20 years and has no plans to build one at this time

http://www.republican-eagle.com/articles/index.cfm?id=54931&section=News

Print Email Font Resize Abolishing nuclear arms would enhance global security

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After a tragedy we often ask: Why did this happen? How did this happen? Could we have prevented it? The tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001, still raise these questions.

In looking ahead as much as looking back, imagine how much worse those losses would have been if the terrorists had used a nuclear weapon.

For decades, nuclear weapons were thought to make us safer by deterring the first strike by another nation. Today we need to re-evaluate the roles and dangers of nuclear weapons in the world. Let’s ask ourselves: Does it help the United States to have nuclear weapons? Would the whole world be safer if no one and no nation had even one of these weapons? Is the mere existence of nuclear weapons a threat?

We believe today that the possession of nuclear weapons actually diminishes our safety. We agree with former cabinet members and a senator, Henry Kissinger, George Shultz, William Perry and Sam Nunn, that our world will be safer when all nuclear weapons have been abolished and that the complete eradication of nuclear weapons should therefore be a high priority of our government.

http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_11096117

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The U.S. Mint Friday is unveiling designs of a new $1 coin that will begin circulating in January as part of a new Native American coin program mandated by Congress.

The coins will feature the image of Sacagawea that was previously on the golden dollar coin, which was created in 2000 and 2001, on the “heads” side. The “tails” side will rotate each year, with the 2009 version featuring a Native American woman planting seeds in a field of corn, beans and squash.

The coins will be gold in color.

http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2008-11-27-new-dollar-coin-sacagawea_N.htm

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